Tuesday 20th June 2017: The use of negtaive imagary and language in communications contributes to weight-related stigma, an expert seminar in Belfast heard today. The All Island Obesity Action Forum is hosted by safefood in collaboration with the Association for the Study of Obesity on the Island of Ireland (ASOI) and the Northern Ireland Regional Group, of the Association for the Study of Obesity (ASO, UK). The forum highligh how stigmatization can have a negative effect on those who need help the most when it comes to their weight. At the conference, safefood also announced plans for a workshop with media to explore the role of communications and weight stigma.

Dr Grace O’Malley, Chair of the ASOI continued ”In clinical settings, we witness the effects of obesity on the physical and psycho emotional health of children and adults. All too often, individuals are stigmatized due to their shape or weight in school, in healthcare, in work, online or just walking around their neighbourhood. This can have devastating effects on them and influence how or whether they interact with the health service. We each have a role to play in tackling this issue – promoting and modeling a healthier lifestyle, enabling a healthier environment, improving access to treatment for patients or portraying weight and obesity in the media in a much more respectful way.”ip and cohesive working on the island of Ireland.

Tuesday 20th June 2017: The use of negative imagery and language in communications contributes to weight-related stigma, an expert seminar in Belfast heard today. The All Island Obesity Action Forum is hosted by safefood in collaboration with the Association for the Study of Obesity on the Island of Ireland (ASOI) and the Northern Ireland Regional Group, of the Association for the Study of Obesity (ASO, UK). The forum highlight how stigmatization can have a negative effect on those who need help the most when it comes to their weight. At the conference, safefood also announced plans for a workshop with media to explore the role of communications and weight stigma.

Dr Grace O’Malley, Chair of the ASOI continued ”In clinical settings, we witness the effects of obesity on the physical and psychoemotional health of children and adults. All too often, individuals are stigmatized due to their shape or weight in school, in healthcare, in work, online or just walking around their neighbourhood. This can have devastating effects on them and influence how or whether they interact with the health service. We each have a role to play in tackling this issue – promoting and modeling a healthier lifestyle, enabling a healthier environment, improving access to treatment for patients or portraying weight and obesity in the media in a much more respectful way.”ip and cohesive working on the island of Ireland.